As a new songwriter, the many varieties of songform might come naturally to you, or it might be a goal that you’re shooting to improve on. But luckily, while there are a ton of models out there for how songs are made to function, there are no hard and fast rules — which means you’re free to learn what tools you need, and then bend them to suit your songwriting practice.

When you establish a color scheme strongly, it becomes even easier to then subvert it and supplant a freshness into your look. White’s video for his solo song “Freedom at 21” exemplifies this perfectly. Here, he puts a ton of emphasis on the neon green of his sports car and the bright pink of the policewoman’s lipstick; the colors feel as though they’re going to jump off the screen at any moment.

We don’t see things like this anymore. Maybe MTV makes artists sign contracts to say they won’t misbehave as such now. Who knows. But Nirvana did misbehave and fought hard to make music dangerous again.

Music venue grants

This international residency program is open to artists across many mediums for one- to three-month long residencies. Artists are given lodging and studio space on a remote island off the northeast coast of Newfoundland, as well as a weekly stipend for materials and day-to-day living. Be prepared to put on your public speaking hat though, as artists are required to give at least one presentation, performance, or workshop during their stay. Residencies open every two years.

The MIDI version is richly informative. There are long passages where there’s almost no rhythmic correspondence between the notes as written (and as “performed” in the MIDI) and the way that humans perform them. People are playing the same notes in the same order, but have pretty much thrown Bach’s written rhythms out the window. But the MIDI isn’t a very satisfying listening experience.

It’s because of these trap doors (motivation, time management, confidence, workflow optimization, proper space and acoustic considerations, gear availabilities, etc.) that musicians with big ideas and significant dreams often fall short of reaching their true home recording potential. So we decided to make next week, June 17-22, 2019, all about that — next week is Home Recording Week on Soundfly.

Program fees: Artists receive a fluctuating honoraria that typically averages around $2,000 to help support the residency costs as well as transportation to the island, etc. The cost to apply is $25.

It’s home to the University of Colorado Boulder, and has a thriving venue scene that includes The Fox Theatre, which Rolling Stone named the fourth best place in the country to see live music. Located in The Hill, a popular destination for college students, it hosts a variety of genres of live music five to six times per week. It’s also home to tons of outdoor summer concerts throughout the week. And speaking of outdoor spots, mountain-view-graced brewery and food truck hub, Rayback Collective, also has a live music stage with bands performing during events and parties. So grab your lemonade (or beer) and guitar, because Boulder is going to be one of your top destinations.

Chamber music magazine

Sorry if you weren’t there, but the late ’90s and early 2000s were fantastic. Once P2P was pioneered via Napster, the floodgates opened and the world of music sharing was here to stay. As an artist and a listener, my personal opinion is that we’ve regressed from that time. The problem with the P2P era, admittedly, was that artists were not getting remunerated for their recordings as disruptive tech eagerly pulled down the bloated major-label system. But, well, we’re still not getting paid that much anyway.

If you want to rock out this Saturday, check out Vagabon at the Silent Barn. They’re opening for Aye Nako (an incredible pop-punk band, releasing their new album), hopefully playing some tunes off of their 2014 release Persian Garden. Laetitia Tamko’s ragged vocals chase distorted lead guitar lines to devastating and gorgeous effect.

I get that — creating something new is scary. You aren’t sure what people will think of it, and you’re worried it will be received negatively. There’s value in taking influence from your favorite musicians, but by copying them, you’re putting yourself in a position where if your music were to suddenly disappear, nobody would miss you as a guitarist because they can easily find your sound somewhere else.

To musically touch your listener, you need to know your listener. And the better you know your listener, the better you can remind that listener of their childhood. Right about now you might be wondering, “But how well can you really know your listener?”

Hopefully you have some ideas for crafting your own narrative now. Remember, your narrative doesn’t need to be groundbreaking, and even if you think you have nothing to say, you can find a story to share.