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Let’s pretend that we have a guitar string tuned to play a note called middle C, which has a frequency of 1 Hz. (In real life, middle C has a frequency of 261.626 Hz, so if you want to think in terms of actual frequencies, just multiply all the numbers in the following paragraphs by 261.626.)

In my video example above, my variations were as follows: First, I removed the hi-hat entirely (variation 1), then I added a kick and snare hit (variation 2), and finally I added kick and snare hits while removing snippets of the hi-hat pattern (variation 3). All of which is in addition to an already interesting yet repetitive beat sequence.

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This idea has been in the pipeline for a while, but the impetus to finally push it to completion was my Fundamentals of Western Music class at the New School. I have been drawing scales and chords on the chromatic circle by hand for a long time, and I wanted to be able to produce them automatically.

A few oddballs and nerds have explored tuning systems that use bigger prime numbers to generate finer pure intervals. Harry Partch used the primes up to 11 to make a tuning system that divides up the octave into 43 pure parts rather than 12 impure ones. You can try the Partch scale using the Wilsonic app or Audiokit Synth One. It’s extremely strange! But, I guess, it’s strange in a pure way?